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There is no evidence that regular monitoring of anti-epileptic drug levels in pregnancy improves seizure control compared with clinical features-based monitoring.

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Shakila Thangaratinam 1,2,3,*, Nadine Marlin 3, Sian Newton 1,3, Annalise Weckesser 4, Manny Bagary 5, Lynette Greenhill 5, Rachel Rikunenko 6, Maria D’Amico 1,3, Ewelina Rogozińska 1,2, Andrew Kelso 7, Kelly Hard 8, Jamie Coleman 9, Ngawai Moss 10, Tracy Roberts 11, Lee Middleton 12, Julie Dodds 1,2,3, Angela Pullen 13, Sandra Eldridge 3, Alexander Pirie 8, Elaine Denny 4, Doug McCorry 5, Khalid S Khan 1,2,3

1 Women’s Health Research Unit, Blizard Institute, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK
2 Multidisciplinary Evidence Synthesis Hub (mEsh), Blizard Institute, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK
3 Pragmatic Clinical Trials Unit, Blizard Institute, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK
4 Centre for Health and Social Care Research, Birmingham City University, Birmingham, UK
5 Neuropsychiatry Department, The Barberry, Birmingham, UK
6 Research and Development, Birmingham Children’s Hospital, Birmingham, UK
7 Department of Neurology, Royal London Hospital, London, UK
8 Research and Development, Birmingham Women’s Hospital, Birmingham, UK
9 School of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
10 Patient and Public Involvement group member, Katie’s Team, Katherine Twining Network, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK
11 Health Economics Unit, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
12 Birmingham Clinical Trials Unit, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
13 Epilepsy Action, Leeds, UK
* Corresponding author Email: s.thangaratinam@qmul.ac.uk

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