Journals Library

An error has occurred in processing the XML document

An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again.

Page not found (404)

Sorry - the page you requested could not be found.

Please choose a page from the navigation or try a website search above to find the information you need.

{{metadata.Title}}

{{metadata.Headline}}

{{author}}{{author}}{{($index < metadata.AuthorsAndEtalArray.length-1) ? ',' : '.'}}

An error has occurred in processing the XML document

An error has occurred in processing the XML document

{{metadata.Journal}} Volume: {{metadata.Volume}}, Issue: {{metadata.Issue}}, Published in {{metadata.PublicationDate | date:'MMMM yyyy'}}

https://doi.org/{{metadata.DOI}}

Citation: {{author}}{{ (($index < metadata.AuthorsArray.length-1) && ($index <=6)) ? ', ' : '' }}{{(metadata.AuthorsArray.length <= 6) ? '.' : '' }} {{(metadata.AuthorsArray.length > 6) ? 'et al.' : ''}} {{metadata.Title}}. {{metadata.JournalShortName}} {{metadata.PublicationDate | date:'yyyy'}};{{metadata.Volume}}({{metadata.Issue}})

Report Content

The full text of this issue is available as a PDF document from the Toolkit section on this page.

The full text of this issue is available as a PDF document from the Toolkit section on this page.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the safety, tolerability and immunogenicity of an AS03(B)/oil-in-water emulsion-adjuvanted (AS03(B)) split-virion versus non-adjuvanted whole-virion H1N1 influenza vaccine in UK children aged 6 months to 12 years.

DESIGN

Multicentre, randomised, head-to-head, open-label trial.

SETTING

Five UK sites (Oxford, Bristol, Southampton, Exeter and London).

PARTICIPANTS

Children aged 6 months to < 13 years, for whom a parent or guardian had provided written informed consent and who were able to comply with study procedures, were eligible for inclusion.

INTERVENTIONS

A tocopherol/oil-in-water emulsion-adjuvanted (AS03(B)) egg culture-derived split-virion H1N1 vaccine and a non-adjuvanted cell culture-derived whole-virion vaccine, given as a two-dose schedule, 21 days apart, were compared. Participants were grouped into those aged 6 months to < 3 years (younger group) and 3 years to < 13 years of age (older group) and were randomised by study investigators (1 : 1 ratio) to receive one of the two vaccines. Vaccines were administered by intramuscular injection (deltoid or anterior-lateral thigh, depending on age and muscle bulk). Local reactions and systemic symptoms were collected for 1 week post immunisation, and serum was collected at baseline and after the second dose. To assess safety and tolerability, parents or guardians recorded the following information in diary cards from days 0-7 post vaccination: axillary temperature, injection site reactions, solicited and unsolicited systemic symptoms, and medications.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE

Comparison between vaccines of the percentage of participants demonstrating seroconversion by microneutralisation assay.

RESULTS

Among 937 children receiving vaccine, per-protocol seroconversion rates were higher after the AS03(B)-adjuvanted vaccine than after the whole-virion vaccine (98.2% vs 80.1% in children < 3 years, 99.1% vs 95.9% among those aged 3-12 years), as were severe local reactions (3.6% vs 0.0% in those under 5 years, 7.8% vs 1.1% in those aged 5-12 years), irritability in children < 5 years (46.7% vs 32.0%), and muscle pain in older children (28.9% vs 13.2%). The second dose of the adjuvanted vaccine was more reactogenic than the first, especially for fever > 38.0°C in those under 5 years of age (8.9% vs 22.4%).

CONCLUSION

The adjuvanted vaccine, although reactogenic, was more immunogenic, especially in younger children, indicating the potential for improved immunogenicity of influenza vaccines in this age group.

TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER

ISRCTN89141709.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the safety, tolerability and immunogenicity of an AS03(B)/oil-in-water emulsion-adjuvanted (AS03(B)) split-virion versus non-adjuvanted whole-virion H1N1 influenza vaccine in UK children aged 6 months to 12 years.

DESIGN

Multicentre, randomised, head-to-head, open-label trial.

SETTING

Five UK sites (Oxford, Bristol, Southampton, Exeter and London).

PARTICIPANTS

Children aged 6 months to < 13 years, for whom a parent or guardian had provided written informed consent and who were able to comply with study procedures, were eligible for inclusion.

INTERVENTIONS

A tocopherol/oil-in-water emulsion-adjuvanted (AS03(B)) egg culture-derived split-virion H1N1 vaccine and a non-adjuvanted cell culture-derived whole-virion vaccine, given as a two-dose schedule, 21 days apart, were compared. Participants were grouped into those aged 6 months to < 3 years (younger group) and 3 years to < 13 years of age (older group) and were randomised by study investigators (1 : 1 ratio) to receive one of the two vaccines. Vaccines were administered by intramuscular injection (deltoid or anterior-lateral thigh, depending on age and muscle bulk). Local reactions and systemic symptoms were collected for 1 week post immunisation, and serum was collected at baseline and after the second dose. To assess safety and tolerability, parents or guardians recorded the following information in diary cards from days 0-7 post vaccination: axillary temperature, injection site reactions, solicited and unsolicited systemic symptoms, and medications.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE

Comparison between vaccines of the percentage of participants demonstrating seroconversion by microneutralisation assay.

RESULTS

Among 937 children receiving vaccine, per-protocol seroconversion rates were higher after the AS03(B)-adjuvanted vaccine than after the whole-virion vaccine (98.2% vs 80.1% in children < 3 years, 99.1% vs 95.9% among those aged 3-12 years), as were severe local reactions (3.6% vs 0.0% in those under 5 years, 7.8% vs 1.1% in those aged 5-12 years), irritability in children < 5 years (46.7% vs 32.0%), and muscle pain in older children (28.9% vs 13.2%). The second dose of the adjuvanted vaccine was more reactogenic than the first, especially for fever > 38.0°C in those under 5 years of age (8.9% vs 22.4%).

CONCLUSION

The adjuvanted vaccine, although reactogenic, was more immunogenic, especially in younger children, indicating the potential for improved immunogenicity of influenza vaccines in this age group.

TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER

ISRCTN89141709.

If you would like to receive a notification when this project publishes in the NIHR Journals Library, please submit your email address below.

 

Responses to this report

No responses have been published.

 

If you would like to submit a response to this publication, please do so using the form below:

Comments submitted to the NIHR Journals Library are electronic letters to the editor. They enable our readers to debate issues raised in research reports published in the Journals Library. We aim to post within 2 working days all responses that contribute substantially to the topic investigated, as determined by the Editors.

Your name and affiliations will be published with your comment.

Once published, you will not have the right to remove or edit your response. The Editors may add, remove, or edit comments at their absolute discretion.

By submitting your response, you are stating that you agree to the terms & conditions